index

Alabama's Deer Hunting Seasons

Alabama's Deer Hunting Seasons

ZONE A

Archery-Stalk Hunting

October 14, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

Special Youth Gun

November 10 – 13, 2023

Either Sex

Special Muzzleloader and Air Rifle

Privately Owned or Leased Land and USFS Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs)

November 13 – 17, 2023

Either Sex

Gun Deer-Stalk Hunting

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Land

November 18 – December 8, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 9 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – February 10, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Gun Deer-Dog Deer Hunting: Where Allowed

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18, 2023 – January 15, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Lands Where Allowed

November 18 – December 8, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 9 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 15, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

ZONE B

Archery-Stalk Hunting

October 14 – 24, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

October 25, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

Special Youth Gun

November 10 – 13, 2023

Either Sex

Special Muzzleloader and Air Rifle

Privately Owned or Leased Land and USFS Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs)

November 13 – 17, 2023

Either Sex

Gun Deer-Stalk Hunting

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Land

November 18 – December 8, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 9 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – February 10, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Gun Deer-Dog Deer Hunting: Where Allowed

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18, 2023 – January 15, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Lands Where Allowed

November 18 – December 8, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 9 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 15, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

ZONE C

Archery-Stalk Hunting

October 14, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

Special Youth Gun

November 10 – 13, 2023

Either Sex

Special Muzzleloader and Air Rifle

Privately Owned or Leased Land and USFS Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs)

November 13 – 17, 2023

Either Sex

Gun Deer-Stalk Hunting

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18 – 26, 2023

Either Sex

November 27 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – February 10, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

On Open Permit Public Land

November 18 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – February 10, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Gun Deer-Dog Deer Hunting: Where Allowed

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18 – 26, 2023

Either Sex

November 27 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 15, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

On Open Permit Public Lands Where Allowed

November 18 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 15, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

ZONE D

Archery-Stalk Hunting

September 30, 2023 – January 15, 2024

Either Sex

January 16 – 27, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Special Youth Gun

October 27 – 30, 2023

Either Sex

Special Muzzleloader and Air Rifle

Privately Owned or Leased Land and USFS Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs)

October 30 – November 3, 2023

Either Sex

Gun Deer-Stalk Hunting

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 4 – 17, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

November 18 – 26, 2023

Either Sex

November 27 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 27, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

On Open Permit Public Land

November 4 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 27, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Gun Deer-Dog Deer Hunting: Where Allowed

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 4 – 17, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

November 18 – 26, 2023

Either Sex

November 27 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Lands Where Allowed

November 4 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

ZONE E

Archery-Stalk Hunting

September 30, 2023 – January 15, 2024

Either Sex

January 16 – 27, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Special Youth Gun

October 27 – 30, 2023

Either Sex

Special Muzzleloader and Air Rifle

Privately Owned or Leased Land and USFS Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs)

October 30 – November 3, 2023

Either Sex

Gun Deer-Stalk Hunting

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 4, 2023 – January 15, 2024

Either Sex

January 16 – 27, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

On Open Permit Public Land

November 4 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 27, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Gun Deer-Dog Deer Hunting: Where Allowed

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 4, 2023 – January 1, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Lands Where Allowed

November 4 – December 15, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 16 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE MANAGEMENT ZONE (CMZ)

Archery-Stalk Hunting

October 14, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

Special Youth Gun

November 10 – 13, 2023

Either Sex

Special Muzzleloader and Air Rifle

Privately Owned or Leased Land and USFS Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs)

November 13 – 17, 2023

Either Sex

Gun Deer-Stalk Hunting

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18, 2023 – February 10, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Land

November 18 – December 8, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 9 – 31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – February 10, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

Gun Deer-Dog Deer Hunting: Where Allowed

On Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

November 18, 2023 – January 15, 2024

Either Sex

On Open Permit Public Lands Where Allowed

November 18 – December 8, 2023

Antlered Bucks Only

December 9 –31, 2023

Either Sex

January 1 – 15, 2024

Antlered Bucks Only

 

 

Mapped Guide for ZONE A Delineation:



Encompassing a distinct landscape, ZONE A demarcates itself starting from the historical link of the Alabama/Mississippi state line with US Hwy. 80 (Sumter County). Trail along US Hwy. 80 east to encounter the US Hwy. 80 Bypass adjacent to Selma (Dallas County), guiding you through an eastward path to the Alabama River.

Chasing the flow of the Alabama River east, you'll reach I-65. A journey south on I-65 will cross I-85, where a turn northward will lead you to AL Hwy. 169 (Exit 60 – Lee County). The route then coaxes you southward along AL Hwy. 169, funneling into a convergence with AL Hwy. 1/US Hwy. 431. Continue your southern advance along this path until AL Hwy. 26 invites you westward.

Navigate west on AL Hwy. 26 to find Russell County Road 65, then south to Russell County Road 4, and continue westbound to Russell County Road 49. This leads you south to US Hwy. 82; an eastern trajectory brings you to the serene Chattahoochee River.

Following the river's southward course, align with AL Hwy. 10 west; this will take you to Henry County Road 57, meandering further south to Henry County Road 99, and finally bringing you back to US Hwy. 431. Cruise south on this highway to Ross Clark Circle, enveloping Dothan, then head eastbound until US Hwy. 231 steers you toward the tranquil Alabama/Florida state line.

Your path pivots east along the state border, meets once more with the Chattahoochee River, and then leads north back to the junction of US Hwy. 82, marking a westward turn to US Hwy. 431. The journey north on US Hwy. 431 to US Hwy. 280 demands an eastward shift, aligning you with the Alabama/Georgia state line.

From there, pressing northwest rendezvouses with I-20, leading you to AL Hwy. 21. Northerly along AL Hwy. 21, course correction comes at US Hwy. 278, eastward to once again touch the Alabama/Georgia state line. The boundary tracking leads north to the Alabama/Tennessee state line, and from there, ventures westward skirting along to the Lauderdale County/Limestone County line.

Descend southward along this county demarcation to the bank of the Tennessee River. A western journey down the river intersects with the Colbert County/Lawrence County line, and guides south to the inter-county border of Colbert County and Franklin. Following the county line west, you're shepherded back to the Alabama/Mississippi state line, concluding again at US Hwy. 80 in Sumter County.

ZONE A thus draws its identity - a circuitous ribbon of highways, state lines, and natural waterways, excluding neighboring Zones C, D, E, and CMZ. It embodies a convergence of history and transport, a corridor of movement framed by nature's flow and humankind's pathways.

 

Defining the Contours of ZONE B:



ZONE B sketches its character from the crossing paths of development and frontier, commencing at the juncture where Mississippi's outline graces US Hwy. 80 (Sumter County). Venture east on this highway to find yourself at the US Hwy. 80 Bypass near Selma (Dallas County). The bypass serves as a guide eastward to the historic Alabama River.

Pursue the eastern stretch of the river until you encounter I-65, then traverse south to the crossroads with I-85. Shifting north on I-85, your path intercepts AL Hwy. 169 (Exit 60 – Lee County), drawing you into a southward descent towards AL Hwy. 1/US Hwy. 431. The route asks you to continue south until AL Hwy. 26 peeks westward.

Align with AL Hwy. 26 briefly before trekking south on Russell County Road 65, which bends westward to meet Russell County Road 4 and then Russell County Road 49, beckoning you south once more. Your guide, US Hwy. 82, emerges, leading eastward to a reunion with US Hwy. 431. Here, an odyssey southwards on US Hwy. 431 is interrupted briefly by an eastern diversion on US Hwy. 82, allowing you to trace the sinuous path of the Chattahoochee River down south.

Nudge west along AL Hwy. 10 to converge with Henry County Road 57, guiding you south until Henry County Road 99 beckons further south to meet again with US Hwy. 431. Follow this highway's lead to Ross Clark Circle, an arc circumventing Dothan, proceeding then on an eastward tangent to US Hwy. 231. This road guides you towards the rustic charm of the Alabama/Florida state line, which escorts you westward back to the familiarity of the Alabama/Mississippi state boundary.

This intricately woven boundary, swimming south then north to culminate again at US Hwy. 80 in Sumter County, carves out ZONE B as an area vested south or west of its uniquely etched line. It stands apart, not just in relief but also in its omission of the neighboring territories demarcated as Zones A and E, laying out a seamless blend of natural watercourses and engineered thoroughfares.

 

Cartographic Snapshot of ZONE C:



ZONE C, an assemblage of contiguous territories spanning Blount, Cullman, Etowah, Franklin, Jefferson, Lawrence, Marion, Morgan, Marshall, St. Clair, Walker, and Winston Counties, is charted distinctly from its northerly brothers. Its genesis is found skirting the Colbert County/Franklin County margin at US Hwy. 43/13. It descends southward as it escorts you to the charming locale of Spruce Pine (Franklin County).

Persist south on AL Hwy. 13, finding respite at AL Hwy. 195 within Haleyville's embrace (Winston County). Thereupon, a northerly pivot along AL Hwy. 195 leads to Winston County Road 93, ascending towards Franklin County Road 93, and then to the byways of Franklin County Road 81, eventually meeting Franklin County Road 83 in a rhythmic march north.

The pathway finds solace eastward along AL Hwy. 24, forging ahead until it intersects AL Hwy. 157 in Moulton (Lawrence County). A southward journey on AL Hwy. 157 introduces you to Cullman County Road 1114, which in turn sweeps south to US Hwy. 278 in Jones Chapel (Cullman County). From here, a westward sojourn along US Hwy. 278 leads to the vein of Helicon Road (Winston County Road 77) descending southward to meet Winston County Road 41 in the quaint township of Arley (Winston County).

Traverse southward with Winston County Road 41 until it converges with the unassuming Sipsey Fork. Trace along the Fork to meet US Hwy. 69, navigating north to the sentinel road of I-65, and from there an impasse, south toward I-59. I-59 beckons northward till US Hwy. 11, which guides north until you grace the Etowah County/Dekalb County line.

Your march redirects westward along the county line, then straddling the Dekalb County/Marshall County division to eventually rendezvous with the Marshall County/Jackson County line; here it stands guard to the north, escorting to the sweeping bend of the Tennessee River. The river's westward course meets the Colbert County/Lawrence County line, which then journeys south to touch once more the Colbert County/Franklin County line and concludes the circumnavigation at US Hwy. 43/13.

This delineation of ZONE C carves out a clearly defined yet intricately connected region, removing itself from the Zone D description. The area stands testimonial to a rich tapestry woven from the interplay of small communities and natural topography, each boundary highlighting a transition from one fragment of identity to another within Alabama's landscape.

 

ZONE D's Geographical Tapestry:



ZONE D, a confined region nestled within the arms of Cullman, Franklin, Lawrence, Morgan, and Winston Counties, reveals its dimensions starting where AL Hwy. 157 intersects AL Hwy. 24 in Moulton (Lawrence County). From there, a foray south on AL Hwy. 157 carries you to the sojourn of Cullman County Road 1114, descending further south until it kisses US Hwy. 278 in Jones Chapel (Cullman County).

A turn to the west on US Hwy. 278 transitions seamlessly to Helicon Road (Winston County Road 77), forging westward to unite with Winston County Road 41 in the heart of Arley (Winston County). The route vowes southward alongside Winston County Road 41, finding companionship in the Sipsey Fork's gentle flow south to the line dividing Winston from Walker County.

The border waltzes west to grace AL Hwy. 5, which then leads a northbound expedition to AL Hwy. 13 at Natural Bridge (Winston County). Pursuing north, AL Hwy. 13 ushers you to AL Hwy. 195 in Haleyville (Winston County), where a turn northward on AL Hwy. 195 greets Winston County Road 93. The journey ascends north on Winston County Road 93, spilling into Franklin County Road 93, then ascending further to Franklin County Road 81, and finally Franklin County Road 83, each stretch beckoning northward.

The narrative continues north along Franklin County Road 83 until AL Hwy. 24 lays eastward before you, delineating its conclusion with quiet return to the embrace of the intersection with AL Hwy. 157 in Moulton (Lawrence County).

ZONE D, defined not solely by natural borders but also by the weaving of thoroughfares, stands as a testament to an interstitial sectionalization between communities, a land of confluences where waterways and byways echo the cadence of transition through Alabama's textured heartland.

 

Encapsulating ZONE E:



ZONE E unfurls its map across Barbour and Russell Counties in a straightforward commitment to geography and roadways. Initiate your orientation at the crossways of US Hwy. 82 and US Hwy. 431 in Eufaula (Barbour County). Set your compass north on US Hwy. 431, converged with heritage and commerce, proceeding to the artery of US Hwy. 280. Eastward, US Hwy. 280 channels your direction until you encounter the lifeblood of the region, the Chattahoochee River. A southern meander along the river's course is inevitable as it leads you back to US Hwy. 82. Venturing west, US Hwy. 82 escorts you to the journey’s inception, intersecting again with US Hwy. 431 in Barbour County.

Further embracing the central-eastern heart of Alabama, ZONE E also claims portions of Calhoun, Cherokee, and Cleburne Counties. This separate but equally definitive boundary starts at the confluence of I-20 and AL Hwy. 21 (Calhoun County). AL Hwy. 21 sets a northbound trajectory, persisting to AL Hwy. 9 in Piedmont (Calhoun County). Then, the march north along AL Hwy. 9 can't help but intersect with US Hwy. 278. Pursue an eastern alignment along US Hwy. 278, until the sovereign Alabama/Georgia state line stands before you. Shadowing the state line south, it guides back to I-20, which in its final westward stretch, completes the loop at AL Hwy. 21 (Calhoun County).

ZONE E is etched into the landscape by an innate symmetry of roadways and natural dividers, presenting a geographical narrative that intertwines Alabama's rustic charm with the vitality of its cross-state conduits. It stands testament to the symbiosis of human progression and the quiet, enduring draw of nature’s borderlines.

 

CWD Containment Effort Navigation:



The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Management Zone (CMZ) is an area of focused wildlife preservation encompassing all territories within Lauderdale and Colbert Counties.

Within this specialized CMZ, we recognize a High-Risk Zone (HRZ), which incorporates all of Lauderdale County and a select segment of Colbert County. This HRZ commences at the Tennessee River’s confluence with the Alabama/Mississippi State line. Here, it descends south, steadfast along the state line until US Hwy. 72 enters the picture. Tracking east along US Hwy. 72 leads to the corridor of US Hwy. 72 ALT. Eastward still on US Hwy. 72 ALT, the route reaches the divider between Colbert County and Lawrence County. The perimeter then climbs northward along the county line until the Tennessee River summons you west, guiding you back to the serenity of the Alabama/Mississippi State line.

Contained also within the CMZ is the Buffer Zone (BZ), with its own defined space in Colbert County. It initiates at the juncture where US Hwy. 72 and the Alabama/Mississippi State line entwine. The boundary plummets south, escorting along the state line, until meeting the Colbert County/Franklin County demarcation. Traversing east, it grazes the hem of the Colbert County/Franklin County line, finds the Colbert County/Lawrence County border, and ascends north to reconnect with US Hwy. 72 ALT. The route diverts west on US Hwy. 72 ALT, merging again with US Hwy. 72 and returning westward to rest at the Alabama/Mississippi State line.

This CMZ, with its HRZ and BZ subzones, embodies Alabama’s dedication to wildlife health management — a delineated strategy to combat the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease among deer populations, safeguarding our natural heritage with precise and methodical regional stewardship.

 

Dog Deer Hunting Regulations


Specific regulations governing the practice of dog deer hunting are enforced within designated counties of Alabama to ensure the activity's sustainability and minimize its ecological impact.

Permits Required for Dog Deer Hunting: In BALDWIN, CHAMBERS, and several delineated areas of CHOCTAW, COLBERT, COOSA, COVINGTON, ELMORE, GENEVA, HENRY, MACON, MARENGO, MONROE, PICKENS, TALLAPOOSA, and WILCOX, dog deer hunting is off-limits without express permission obtained through a special permit issued by the Department. Notably, property owners in CHAMBERS and COOSA counties are exempt from this permit requirement when hunting on their land. Public lands designated as "Open Permit-Public Land" (refer to 220-2-.85) are entirely restricted from dog deer hunting.

Stalk Hunting Exclusively: Other counties enforce an absolute restriction on the use of dogs for hunting deer, insisting on stalk hunting only. These counties include BIBB, PERRY (with specific regional boundaries detailed), BUTLER, CHEROKEE, CHILTON, CLEBURNE, an outlined sector of COFFEE, segments of CRENSHAW, a particular part of DALE, DEKALB, portions of ELMORE, select regions within FAYETTE, FRANKLIN, specified boundaries in HALE and PERRY, GREENE, PICKENS and TUSCALOOSA (with certain area restrictions), HOUSTON, JACKSON, LAMAR, LAUDERDALE, LAWRENCE, LIMESTONE, MADISON, MARION, MARSHALL, MORGAN, RANDOLPH, northern sections of TUSCALOOSA, and defined territories of WINSTON.



Regulatory Brief on Hunting on Federal Lands:



For enthusiasts venturing onto U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Lands in Alabama, it's imperative to first consult with USACE for any specific hunting regulations or restrictions, including potential requisite special permits or notices of region closures. The USACE sets management policies for various activities, such as hunting and use of boat ramps. Detailed guidelines and regulations are accessible on the USACE Mobile District’s official digital repository.
.

Furthermore, on lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), hunting is regimented as follows:

STALK HUNTING – Pursuing game without the aid of dogs is in adherence with the open permit dates for each county. An exception exists within Wildlife Management Areas, where hunting is confined to the stipulation of one deer per day.

DOG DEER HUNTING – Utilizing dogs for hunting deer is generally prohibited across USFS territories. Notable exceptions are allotted for USFS-managed lands in Calhoun, Clay, and Talladega counties during the designated Dog Deer Season on public lands open to hunting – permissible on Thursdays and Fridays until 2:00 p.m., and during legal shooting hours on Saturdays and Sundays. Dog deer hunting is forbidden on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, with the sole exception of the holidays of Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, should they fall on these days—no allowances are made for other state or federal holidays. Similar to stalking, the bag limit remains one deer per day.

Special Note: The Piney Woods/Ivory Mountain Area specifically prohibits dog deer hunting. This area is demarcated clearly: its northern frontier is the Cleburne County line, while its western guardrail is Clay County Road 3 south to State Route 49. The southern perimeter is marked by Clay County Road 66 running eastward from State Route 49 to Hwy 9; and finally, the eastern boundary is Hwy 9 ascending north from Clay County Road 66 to the Cleburne County line.

Wild Advisor Pro

Disclaimer:

The legal advice provided on Wild Advisor Pro is intended as a summary of the hunting, camping, hiking, and fishing laws and regulations and does not constitute legal language or professional advice. We make every effort to ensure the information is accurate and up to date, but it should not be relied upon as legal authority. For the most current and comprehensive explanation of the laws and regulations, please consult the official government websites or a qualified legal professional. Wild Advisor Pro is not responsible for any misunderstandings or misinterpretations of the information presented and shall not be held liable for any losses, damages, or legal disputes arising from the use of this summary information. Always check with the appropriate governmental authorities for the latest information regarding outdoor regulations and compliance.